Chemical elements
  Boron
    Isotopes
    Energy
    Production
    Application
    Physical properties
    Chemical properties
      Boron Hydrides
      Tetraborodecahydride
      Borobutane
      Hexaborododecahydride
      Borohexylene
      Boron trihydride
      Boro-ethane
      Decaborotetradecahydride
      Boron halogen
      Boron trifluoride
      Hydrofluoboric acid
      Potassium borofluoride
      Fluoboric acid
      Perfluoboric acid
      Boron subchloride
      Boron trichloride
      Boron tribromide
      Boron tri-iodide
      Oxides of Boron
      Tetraboron trioxide
      Boron dioxide
      Tetraboron pentoxide
      Borohydrates
      Hypoborates
      Boron sesqui-oxide
      Boron trioxide
      Boric anhydride
      Boric Acids
      Orthoboric acid
      Boric acid
      Boracic acid
      Complex Boric Acids
      Perboric Acid and Perborates
      Sodium perborate
      Sodium hyperborate
      Potassium perborate
      Rubidium perborate
      Ammonium perborate
      Barium perborate
      Boron sesquisulphide
      Boron trisulphide
      Boron pentasulphide
      Boron selenide
      Boron nitride
      Boron amide
      Boron imide
      Boron phosphide
      Boron phospho-iodides
      Boron carbide
      Boron thiocyanate
      Boron Alkyls
      Boron trimethyl
      Boron Silicides and
      Boroethane

Boron phosphide, BP






Boron phosphide, BP, is prepared by heating boron phospho-iodide to 450°-500° in a current of hydrogen. The iodine can also be removed from the phospho-iodide by heating with mercury or silver. Another method of preparation consists in heating the compound BBr3.PH3 to 300°, when hydrogen bromide is eliminated.

Boron phosphide is a light, amorphous, maroon-coloured powder, insoluble in the usual inorganic and organic solvents. It burns in chlorine in the cold and in bromine when warmed; at 200° it burns brilliantly in oxygen, and it also reacts with heated sulphur. It is not affected by iodine, nitrogen, phosphorus, or arsenic even at a red heat. It is attacked by numerous metals at a red heat, and is easily oxidised by concentrated nitric acid or fused alkali nitrates.

When heated in hydrogen at 1000°, a brown boron subphosphide, B5P3, is produced which is much less reactive than the phosphide.


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